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Organizational Ecology: Demography and Dynamics

Organizational and Corporate Demography (with Olga M. Khessina). In Handbook of Population (Second Edition), Dudley I. Poston Jr.(ed.), Chapter 20 (pp. 521-554), Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature, 2019.
Organizational Ecology (with Michael T. Hannan). In International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences (2nd ed.), Vol. 17, ed. J. Wright, 358-363. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2015. | Publisher
Sociology and Strategy (with Jesper B. Sørensen). In Palgrave Encyclopedia of Strategic Management, eds. M. Augier and D. J. Teece, Palgrave, 2014.
The Handover in Hong Kong: Impact on Business Formation (with Mi Feng and Jeroen G. Kuilman). Sociological Science, September 2014.
Glenn Carroll: How Did Hong Kong’s Transition Affect Entrepreneurship? Insights by Stanford Business, July 2014.

New research says start-up activity declined after the handover, compared to what it should have been had things remained the same.

Authentication: Self-Proclamations and Audience Perceptions (with Balázs Kovács and David Lehman). Workshop on Organizational Ecology, Barcelona, Spain, July 2014.
Glenn Carroll: How Do Local Businesses Affect Social Policy? Insights by Stanford Business, January 2014.

New research explores the impact of gay-owned businesses on anti-discrimination laws.

Challenger Groups, Commercial Organizations, and Policy Enactment: An Empirical Study of Local Lesbian/Gay Rights Ordinances (with Giacomo Negro and Fabrizzio Perritti). American Journal of Sociology, 119 (2013): 790–832.
Restaurant Organizational Forms and Community in the U.S. in 2005 (with Magnus Thor Torfason). City & Community, 10 (2011): 1-24.
Organizational Form Emergence and Competing Professional Schemata of Dutch Accounting, 1884-1939 (with Sandy Bogaert and Christophe Boone). Research in the Sociology of Organizations, 31 (2010): 15-150.
The Social Lives of Products: Analyzing Product Demography for Management Theoryand Practice (with Olga M. Khessina and David G. McKendrick ). The Academy of Management Annals, 4 (2010): 157-203.
Niche Width and Scale in Organizational Competition: A Computational Approach (with Balázs Kovács). Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory, 16 (2010): 29-60.
Studying Populations of Organizations Over Time (with Mi Feng, Gaël Le Mens, and David G. McKendrick). In The SAGE Handbook of Organizational Research Methods, eds. D. Buchanan and A. Bryman, 213-229. Newbury Park: Sage, 2009. | Amazon | Publisher
Newspaper Organizational Population Structure and Election Turnout in U.S. Local Communities 1870-1972 (with Hongwei Xu, and Özgecan Koçak). Working Paper No. 3041, January 2009.
Growing Church Organizations in Diverse U.S. Communities 1890-1926 (with Özegan Koçak). American Journal of Sociology, 113 (2008): 1272-1315.
Product Demography of De Novo and De Alio Firms in the Optical Disk Drive Industry, 1983-1999 (with Olga M. Khessina). Organization Science, 19 (2008): 25-38.
Logics of Organization Theory: Audiences, Codes, and Ecologies (with Michael T. Hannan and László Pólos). Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2007. | Amazon | Publisher | Google Books | Goodreads

Logics of Organization Theory sets forth and applies a new language for theory building based on a non-monotonic logic and fuzzy set theory. In doing so, not only does it mark a major advance in organizational theory, but it also draws lessons for theory building elsewhere in the social sciences.  Organizational research typically analyzes organizations in categories such as “bank,” “hospital,” or “university.” These categories have been treated as crisp analytical constructs designed by researchers. But sociologists increasingly view categories as constructed by audiences. This book builds on cognitive psychology and anthropology to develop an audience-based theory of organizational categories. It applies this framework and the new language of theory building to organizational ecology. It reconstructs and integrates four central theory fragments, and in so doing reveals unexpected connections and new insights.

Organizational Demography In International Encyclopedia of Organization Studies, eds. S. Clegg and J. R. Bailey, Newbury Park: Sage, 2007. | Publisher
Organizational and Corporate Demography (with Olga M. Khessina ). In Handbook of Population, eds. D. L. Poston Jr. and M. Micklin, Chapter 15, 451-477. Springer, 2005. | Amazon
The ecology of entrepreneurship (with Olga M. Khessina). In Handbook of Entrepreneurship: Disciplinary Perspectives, 167-200. New York: Kluwer, 2005. | Amazon
Size, Differentiation and the Performance of Dutch Daily Newspapers (with Christophe Boone and Arjen van Witteloostuijn). Industrial and Corporate Change, 13 (2004): 117-148.
The Evolution of Inertia (with Michael T. Hannan and László Pólos). Industrial and Corporate Change, 13 (2004): 213-242.
The Organizational Niche (with Michael T. Hannan and László Pólos). Sociological Theory, 21 (2003): 309-340.
The Fog of Change: Opacity and Asperity in Organizations (with Michael T. Hannan and László Pólos). Administrative Science Quarterly, 48 (2003): 399-432.
Cascading Organizational Change (with Michael T. Hannan and László Pólos). Organization Science, 14 (2003): 463-482.
Shifting Gears, Shifting Niches: Organizational Inertia and Change in the Evolution of the U.S. Automobile Industry, 1885–1981 (with Stanislav Dobrev and Tai-Young Kim). Organization Science, 14 (2003): 264-282.
Why Do Some Companies Thrive While Others Fail? Insights by Stanford Business, August 2002.

Researchers in the growing field of organizational ecology say it's vital to look at the entire life cycle of the business, including the failures.

The Evolution of Organizational Niches: U.S. Automobile Manufacturers, 1885–1981 (with Stanislav Dobrev and Tai-Young Kim). Administrative Science Quarterly, 47 (2002): 233-264.
Marktwerking is selectiewerk: Van populatie-ecologie naar organisatiedemografie (with Michael T. Hannan and Arjen van Witteloostuijn). Bedrijfskunde, 73 (2001): 31-37.
Cover: The Demography of Corporations and Industries
The Demography of Corporations and Industries (with Michael T. Hannan). Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2000. | Amazon | Publisher | Google Books | Goodreads

The Demography of Corporations and Industries is the first book to present the demographic approach to organizational studies in its entirety. It examines the theory, models, methods, and data used in corporate demographic research. Carroll and Hannan explore the processes by which corporate populations change over time, including organizational founding, growth, decline, structural transformation, and mortality. They review and synthesize the major theoretical mechanisms of corporate demography, ranging from aging and size dependence to population segregation and density dependence. The book also explores some selected implications of corporate demography for public policy, including employment and regulation.

Why Corporate Demography Matters: Policy Implications of Organizational Diversity (with Michael T. Hannan). California Management Review, 42 (2000): 148-163.
Organizational Mortality in European and American Automobile Industries Part I: Revisiting the Effects of Age and Size (with Michael T. Hannan, Stanislav D. Dobrev, and Joon Han). European Sociological Review, 14 (1998): 279-302.
Organizational Mortality in European and American Automobile Industries Part II: Coupled Clocks (with Michael T. Hannan, Stanislav D. Dobrev, Joon Han, and John C. Torres). European Sociological Review, 14 (1998): 303-313.
Legitimation, Geographical Scale, and Organizational Density: Regional Patterns of Foundings of American Automobile Producers, 1885–1981 (with Lyda S. Bigelow, Marc-David L. Seidel, and Lucia B. Tsai). Social Science Research, 26 (1997): 377-398.
The Fates of De Novo and De Alio Producers in the American Automobile Industry 1885-1981 (with Lyda S. Bigelow, Marc-David L. Seidel, and Lucia B. Tsai). Strategic Management Journal, Special Issue: Evolutionary Perspectives on Strategy, 17 (1996): 117-137.
An Introduction to Organizational Ecology (with Michael T. Hannan). In Organizations in Industry: Strategy, Structure and Selection, eds. G. R. Carroll and M. T. Hannan, 17-32. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. | Amazon
Automobile Manufacturers (with Michael T. Hannan). In Organizations in Industry: Strategy, Structure and Selection, eds. G. R. Carroll and M. T. Hannan, 195-214. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. | Amazon
Beer Brewers (with Anand Swaminathan). In Organizations in Industry: Strategy, Structure and Selection, eds. G. R. Carroll and M. T. Hannan, 223-243. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. | Amazon
Newspaper Publishers In Organizations in Industry: Strategy, Structure and Selection, eds. G. R. Carroll and M. T. Hannan, 183-194. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. | Amazon
Focus on Industry: The Organizational Lens (with Michael T. Hannan). In Organizations in Industry: Strategy, Structure and Selection, eds. G. R. Carroll and M. T. Hannan, 3-16. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. | Amazon
Theory Building and Cheap Talk About Legitimation: Reply to Baum and Powell (with Michael T. Hannan). American Sociological Review, 60 (1995):539-544.
Modeling Internal Organizational Change (with William Barnett). Annual Review of Sociology, 21 (1995): 217-236.
Organizational Evolution in a Multinational Context: Entries of Automobile Manufacturers in Belgium, Britain, France, Germany, and Italy (with Michael T. Hannan, Elizabeth A. Dundon, John C. Torres). American Sociological Review, 60 (1995): 509-528.
Cover: Organizations in Industry
Organizations in Industry: Strategy, Structure and Selection (with Michael T. Hannan). New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. | Amazon

Offers an in-depth look at historical organizational reality. Intended as a real world companion to classes that involve the theoretical analysis of formal organizations, this straightforward, accessible text presents an inside look at the actual structure and evolution of numerous different industries. Individual chapters are on specific industries and discuss developments from the origin of the industry to the near present, covering automobile manufacture, biotechnology, financial services, health care, labor organizing, microcomputer manufacture, art museums, newspaper publishing, radio broadcasting, railroad transport, and telephony. Ideal for any course in organizational behavior or theory, the benefits of this approach include practical institutional knowledge about particular industries, valuable insight into organizational society through comparative analysis, a clear understanding of the real-life difficulty associated with organizational change, and an opportunity to study the operation of selection processes among organizations.

Organizational Ecology Approaches to Institutions (with William P. Barnett). In Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Organizations, eds. S. Lindenberg, H. Schreuder, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 1993.
How Institutional Constraints Affected the Organization of Early American Telephony (with William P. Barnett). Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, 9 (1993):98-126.
Competition and Mutualism Among Early Telephone Companies (with William P. Barnett). Administrative Science Quarterly, 32 (1987): 400-421.